“Emancipation of the Land” in Britain and Persia

The U.S. Senate voted, 47-23, in favor of amending Article II, Section 1, of the United States Constitution to limit American presidents to a single, six-year term. The measure for an 18th Amendment to the Constitution was passed “by the necessary two-thirds vote and one to spare”, and sent to the House for consideration.
President Taft signed the bill authorizing the construction of a memorial to Abraham Lincoln in Washington’s Potomac Park

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The British consular garrison at Shiraz, Iran comes under fire, complicating Lord High Admiral Churchill’s plan to convert at least a part of the British Navy of petro-burning engines, allowing heavy warships a greater cruising range. This was a response to a naval arms race between Britain and Germany in the North Sea, forcing Britain to concentrate an ever greater proportion of its global navy in Europe. Aside from moving to oil-burning ships, Britain was also drafting its Canadian and Australian dominions into the new shipbuilding effort. The German naval strategy was having its desired effect, undermining the British global naval strategic posture.

And Lloyd George weighs in on the necessity of  “Emancipation of the Land” in Britain.  “The raw youth from the mountains” Mr. George turns out be be quite the speechifying comedian.  He also states that his Liberal Party “was now engaged in carrying laboriously uphill the last few columns out of the Gladstonian quarry”.   One of these columns was “the emancipation of the land of this country from the grip of an effete and unprofitable system”.  And Mr. George most definitely refers to the emancipation of land, not people.  Much as Churchill’s Britain sought the emancipation of the Abadan oilfields in pursuit of his new naval strategy.

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